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The Ultimate Beach Full-Body Workout

There’s a feeling you get when you go to the beach – the smell, sound and sea water seems to have a rejuvenating effect. As most Australians do, I try to go to the beach as often as I can. Going to the beach in the morning or afternoon for a workout is one of the best ways to start or finish your day! Working out at the beach needs little equipment as it’s all there for you – sand and water.

Let me show you a workout that you can do at the beach to keep or get a nice ripped rig this summer.

 

In The Sand

When you workout in one of my beach sessions you have to earn your way into the water. So your workout will start on the sand. Please be a nice respectful beach-goer and go away from the main crowd of people when doing your workout, find your own space that you need. This not only keeps your hard work (sweat and flying sand) to your area, but keeps them out of your way when you’re working out.

You’re going to start with a 5-10min warm up of dynamic stretches and movements until you feel ready. If you need longer then take it.

 

12-20 Squats with a 10m Sprint

Squats are one of the best lower body exercises we can do because they work your glutes, quads and hamstrings (butt and thighs). The great thing about squats at the beach is the uneven surface of the sand meaning you have to balance yourself more than a flat surface at the gym, using more muscles. The most basic starting point for a squat is to imagine you’re sitting down on a chair and then standing up, that is the basic movement of the squat. The key points to remember when doing squats are:

Keep your upper body as straight and vertical as you can. Don’t let your knees go in front of your toes, your shin bone should be straight up and down. Keep your eyes up, don’t look down at your feet or it will make you lean forward. After your last body squat you have to then sprint 10m along the sand.

 

Lunges-30m

Lunges are great again for your glutes and legs. The basic movement of the lunges is that you bend down on one knee and then back up again. The keys points for lunges are the same as squats. There are some variations of lunges that you can try if you master the straight forward lunge. You can do backwards lunges, you can add a twist which will give your core a better workout (if you step out and lunge with your right leg then you twist to the right, step with the left then you twist to the left) and finally doing any of these variations with your eyes closed. When you progress to weights, all you need to do is find a big rock at the beach or bring your own weight, then you’ll want to hold the weight in front of your chest.

 

Flags -20m

Flags is one the surf lifesavers will know. You lie flat on the ground and the flag you’re trying to capture is behind you. So plant a piece of hose, grass or a stick in the ground, walk 20m away and then lie down on your stomach. Then you jump up, turn around and race to the flag. This works best if you have at least 1 person to race against so bring your fitness buddies to the beach.

 

Push-Ups

Push-ups have to be included in any workout with limited equipment! If you are starting out and struggling to smash out a good number of push-ups, then do half push-ups with your knee’s on the ground. A variation of the normal push up where you have your hands about shoulder width apart is to have your hands closer together so your hands make the shape of a diamond. If you do push-ups like this, you’ll be focusing more on your triceps (back on your upper arm)

 

Plank

Everyone should know this one! You’ll be balancing yourself up by your toes and elbows with your body being nice and rigid. Make sure you don’t let your back strain toward the ground. If in doubt, put your butt out in the air. Your aim is to have a nice straight line from your ankles to your shoulders.

 

Mountain Climbers

Lots of variations on this one but the ones I do in my sessions start with hands on the ground in the push-up position. Then you do some knee’s straight up under you, followed by your knee’s coming outside your elbows, finishing with your knee going to the opposite elbow. Each knee needs to come up for each variation between 5-10 times.

 

Water Time

Now to start this off remember not to be a hero and only go into depths and swell you can cope with and be safe at all times.

Working out in the waves after that grueling sand session will seem like bliss. The water training I do in my sessions is kept simple as far as what you have to do so there’s not complicated movements or equipment to get tangled up in.

 

Shore to Surf

Go to the point on the sand furthest from the water and lye down like in Flags, then get up and race to the back of the surf (if capable) or to a set mark in the waves. Depending on how far your run is you can either make it first to the marker in the water or you can make it first into the water and back out.

 

Water Running – 25-50m

This is pretty simple. Pick a distance to run (in this case between 25 and 50m) and then go. Now the rules for this are you must be at least into water up to your knee’s. If you are going to go out past your waist you can hold a weight to help your feet stay down on the sand. Use the rock from earlier or bring a weight with you.

I would run through the sand drills 2-3 times depending on your fitness levels and then each of the water drills 2-3 times each. Again, this will depend on your fitness levels.

Then I would have a nice sit on the sand and stretch and relax and take in Australia’s beautiful ocean for 5-10mins. Getting out of the gym and into the outdoors will do good for your mental health and rejuvenate your fitness journey. We have some of the best beaches in the world so make the most of them this summer by doing a few workouts on them.

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Author
Dee Herde

Dee Herde
Dee has been personal training since 2005. He uses his own lifestyle and training as an experiment to continue his learning and come up with new techniques to help people achieve their goal. Read more articles by Dee Herde

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